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SUB

The Dance Company of Amsterdam, NL
Rambert Dance Company, UK
Compañía Nacional de Danza, Spain

Choreography: Itzik Galili

Light design: Yaron Abulafia

Costume design: Natasja Lansen

Music: Michael Gordon

Photos by © Pedro Arnay & © Jacobo Medrano & © Karel Zwaneveld


World premiere at Theater Bellevue Amsterdam, The Netherlands - March 2009
UK premiere at Sadler’s Wells Theatre, London- May 2012
Spain premiere at Teatro de la Zarzuela, Madrid - November 2013

Dance

SUB starts with an explosion of thunder in the dark. A lonely figure dances in a soft circle of light, topless and wearing an army greatcoat as a kilt. The tension in Michael Gordon’s string quartet, Weather One, increases in intervals of turbulences, but every section that seems to escalate to the climax, calms down and brings about a new, even more intense phase.

 

SUB is a train that starts to go and just keeps on running – well-organized juxtapositions of chaos and order, storm and calm, which leave you on the edge of your seat. The piece is set for seven masculine dancers, reminiscent of gladiators in the battlefield, exploding of testosterone, strength and elegance, and sprinkling a pinch of skillful capoeira, with high speed and precision. They are haunted, perhaps traumatized, by an invisible enemy, and the light plays the role of a ‘force majeur’ by metamorphosing their surrounding and their look. The seven men dance for all they are worth, taking risks with their own force and in last-minute catches.

"One thing that can be seen from above is pattern. Fortunately there is plenty of that in Itzik Galili’s SUB and the lighting by Yaron Abulafia is particularly sculptural…the scene is set for a work that is in turn hard-edged, nervy and menacing. These qualities are laid down on each layer of music, choreography and lighting…giving a sense that SUB has been choreographed in light as much as in movement.
Abulafia has created shadows on the stage in which a line of dancers will lurk while a duet or trio takes place in the light and the dancers never seem to exit; they glide instead into dark light, giving the work a feeling of constant intense activity."
(Nicholas Minns, review published in Writing About Dance)